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  • The Happy Worker Image
  • The Happy Worker

  • Original Title:
  • The Happy Worker
  • Screening Time:
  • Year:
  • 2019

  • The heroes of our film have a steady, respected job that is not physically demanding and comes with a nice salary. They should feel lucky. Yet they are among some of the most unhappy people working. On their morning commute to the office they dread the day ahead: They have a pile of work waiting for them, but they probably won’t get it done. Their day will be consumed by constant interruptions, pointless meetings, binfulls of irrelevant emails and ever more frequent unfathomable corporate mission statement briefings. The work that they need to be doing will be pushed forward. So they take the work home. A 2013 Gallup study conducted in 142 countries found that only 13% of workers felt motivated in their work. In a similar study in the US it was found that only 45% of office time was spent on the “real job”. In Britain, 37% of workers thought that their job was utterly meaningless. This is a problem that affects hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of people. In the 1930’s John Maynard Keynes, one of the greatest economists of the 20th century, predicted that within a century a higher level of education and the automation of the work place would mean that people would only have to work 15-hour weeks. The rest of our time could be spent on other activities. We have made incredible advances in education and automation, yet most people struggle to get their work done within an 8-hour day. How is this possible? Why do we have less time to do our work, not more?

  • Director:
  • John Webster
  • Genre:
  • Documentary
  • Duration:
  • TBC
  • Status:
  • In Development
  • Country:
  • Finland
  • Production Company:
  • Yellow Film & TV
    Riku Riihilahti
  • Sales Company:
  • Available
  • About the director:
    Born in Finland of British parents, John Webster has been directing and producing documentary films for over 25 years. Typical to his films are human-interest stories with strong central characters whose lives are followed over a long period of time. His films have been broadcasted and awarded at many festivals. Two of them have received Jussi awards.
  • « Back to Catalogue
  • The Happy Worker Image
  • The Happy Worker

  • The Happy Worker
  • Year:
  • 2019

  • Director:
  • John Webster
  • Genre:
  • Documentary
  • Duration:
  • TBC
  • Status:
  • In Development
  • Country:
  • Finland
  • Production Company:
  • Yellow Film & TV
    Riku Riihilahti
  • Sales Company:
  • Available
  • The heroes of our film have a steady, respected job that is not physically demanding and comes with a nice salary. They should feel lucky. Yet they are among some of the most unhappy people working. On their morning commute to the office they dread the day ahead: They have a pile of work waiting for them, but they probably won’t get it done. Their day will be consumed by constant interruptions, pointless meetings, binfulls of irrelevant emails and ever more frequent unfathomable corporate mission statement briefings. The work that they need to be doing will be pushed forward. So they take the work home. A 2013 Gallup study conducted in 142 countries found that only 13% of workers felt motivated in their work. In a similar study in the US it was found that only 45% of office time was spent on the “real job”. In Britain, 37% of workers thought that their job was utterly meaningless. This is a problem that affects hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of people. In the 1930’s John Maynard Keynes, one of the greatest economists of the 20th century, predicted that within a century a higher level of education and the automation of the work place would mean that people would only have to work 15-hour weeks. The rest of our time could be spent on other activities. We have made incredible advances in education and automation, yet most people struggle to get their work done within an 8-hour day. How is this possible? Why do we have less time to do our work, not more?

  • About the director:
    Born in Finland of British parents, John Webster has been directing and producing documentary films for over 25 years. Typical to his films are human-interest stories with strong central characters whose lives are followed over a long period of time. His films have been broadcasted and awarded at many festivals. Two of them have received Jussi awards.